Kynsa ha Diwettha – Agan Tirwedh Bewa ha Gonis
First and Last – Our Living Working Landscape
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2020-02-06 Polypody on Cornish hedge 09I started as Programme Manager in early November. I’m a complete newcomer to Cornwall, having moved down from Orkney, where we’d been living over the previous decade.

I’m so pleased to be living somewhere so wonderful. I’m finding the Penwith Landscape Partnership’s programme of work to be fascinating – it is a privilege to be helping contribute to the conservation and enhancement of such a special landscape. I can see exactly why the National Lottery Heritage Fund, Cornwall Council and Cornwall AONB has invested so heavily in the area through PLP.

I’m especially impressed by our work with local farmers in beef, dairy and horticulture. I’ve a lot to learn about how these local businesses run, but I’ve got a wealth of insight on hand from our Farm Environment Officer, Phil Pengelly. I’ve found it very interesting to attend workshops and briefings run by the organisations (Precision Grazing, and LEAF – Linking Environment and Farming) who are working with local monitor farms, and really appreciate the support that PLP has from Farm Cornwall and the NFU’s county advisor.

My background is in nature conservation, so I’m loving seeing Penwith’s wildlife, from hedges decked out in Hart’s-tongue Fern and Polypodies to the Choughs along the coast. We found the perfect day to get up onto Carnyorth Common this week with our access officer, Matt Watts, where a pair of Ravens were displaying over Carn Kenidjack. I can highly recommend this trail if you would like to explore that area.

I’m astonished by the ancient field systems. I thought Orkney was rich in archaeology, but Penwith has even more in the way of fascinating remains. I’ve also had some success in spreading the understanding of the special character of Cornish hedges – our Orcadian removal men were very surprised to find that there was no cutting corners with their van on a tight bend when the field boundaries are granite-lined.

I’m finding our website as a brilliant way to get introduced to Penwith. I’m yet to get up to Chûn Castle, but the 3d tour is so incredible I almost feel I know it already. Have you had a look? If not, then click here to explore.

Tagged under: GeneralKedhlow Ollgemmyn